Sherri Papini sentenced to 18 months in prison for kidnapping hoax

A Northern California mother of two children was sentenced Monday to 18 months in prison for moving back to her ex-boyfriend, which led to a three-week, multi-state, multi-state run before reuniting on Thanksgiving Day in 2016. The search took place. Sherry Papini, 40, pleaded guilty last spring under a plea deal that required her to pay more than $300,000 in restitution. Probation officers and Papini’s lawyer had recommended that he spend one month in custody and seven months in supervised home detention. But senior US District Judge William Shub said he opted for an 18-month sentence to deter others. The judge said he considered the gravity of the crime and “the number of people affected.” Emotional throughout the proceedings, Papini replied quietly, “Yes, sir,” when the judge asked if she understood the punishment. Defense lawyer William Portanova said after the hearing that she was in tears earlier when she made a statement to the court, admitting responsibility and admitting her guilt. Papini accepted his sentence as part of his recovery. The judge’s sentence was justified, despite “missing the mark” and being “longer than we wanted”. “By the time he sentenced her, he knew her heart,” Portanova said. Asked about the judge’s comment that Papini would still be telling a lie if he hadn’t been caught, Portanova said, that when Papini came to his office, “he told us the truth, maybe not immediately but it was true.” ” , video below | After Portanova was sentenced, Sherri Papini’s lawyer had previously stated that Papini was upset and honored and should serve most of her sentence at home. However, prosecutors said it was imperative that he spend his entire term in prison. The judge ordered him to report to jail on November 8. “The hoax to kidnap Papini was deliberate, well-planned and sophisticated,” prosecutors Veronica Allegria and Shelley Weger wrote in their court filings. And she was still falsely telling people that she was kidnapped months after pleading guilty in April to staging the kidnapping and lying to the FBI about it, they wrote. Alegria said out of court on Monday that he agreed with the judge that “it is very important that we send a message to anyone who is or is thinking of lying to the FBI or other law enforcement officials.” That they can deceive the government and cause harm to the victims.” “And I think it’s important that people know they can’t commit these crimes and get away with it scot-free,” she said. Portanova wrote in her counter-court filing: “Outwardly endearing and endearing, yet capable of intense deceit … Ms. Papini’s chameleon personality drives her to simultaneously crave family security and the freedom of youth. ” So “in pursuit of a non-sensical fantasy,” said Portanova, the married mother ran away from her home in Redding to an ex-boyfriend in Southern California, about 600 miles south. When she said she wanted to go home, He dropped her off on Interstate 5, about 150 miles from her home. Passersby found her with a bandage on her body, a swollen nose, a blurred “brand” on her right shoulder, bruises and rashes around her. body, ligature marks on his wrists and ankles, and burns on his left forearm. All injuries were self-inflicted and designed to substantiate his story that he was abducted at gunpoint by two Hispanic women when she was out for a run. The wounds were an expression of her “volatile malevolence” and “self-inflicted austerity,” wrote Portanova. And once she began, “Each lie made another lie demanded.” Prosecutors said that Papini’s moves only harmed himself and his family. “An entire community believed the fraud and lived in fear. that Hispanic women were roaming the streets to kidnap and sell women,” he wrote. Prosecutors agreed to seek a sentence at the lower end of the sentence in exchange for Papini’s plea of ​​guilty. It was estimated to range from eight to 14 months in custody, down from the maximum 25 years for the two charges. She offered no rationale for her actions, which stunned even independent mental health experts, who said her actions did not suit anyone. specific diagnosis. “Papini’s painful early years twisted and solidified him in myriad ways,” said Portanova, arguing for home confinement. With his deception finally revealed, he said, “It is hard to imagine a more brutal public revelation of a person’s broken inner self. At this point, the punishment is already intense and would have felt like a life sentence.” But prosecutors said her “past trauma and mental health issues alone cannot account for all of her actions. In advance—it wasn’t just a reaction to a traumatic childhood,” he wrote. Following her arrest in March, Papini received more than $30,000 worth of psychiatric care for anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. He sent the Victim Compensation Bill to the state. funds for the treatment, and now he has to pay it back as part of his restoration. As part of the plea agreement, she has agreed to reimburse and repay law enforcement agencies more than $150,000 for the cost of searching for her and her non-abductees. She has received $128,000 in disability payments since her return. . , video below | Sherry Papini’s husband files for divorce

A Northern California mother of two children was sentenced Monday to 18 months in prison for moving back to her ex-boyfriend, which led to a three-week, multi-state, multi-state run before reuniting on Thanksgiving Day in 2016. The search took place.

Sherry Papini, 40, pleaded guilty last spring under a plea deal that required her to pay more than $300,000 in restitution.

Probation officers and Papini’s lawyer had recommended that he remain under house arrest for one month and seven months under observation. But senior US District Judge William Shub said he opted for an 18-month sentence to deter others.

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This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information on their web site.

This content is imported from Twitter. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information on their web site.

The judge said he considered the seriousness of the crime and the “number of people affected”.

Emotional throughout the proceedings, Papini replied quietly, “Yes, sir,” when the judge asked if she understood the sentence. Earlier she was crying as she gave a statement to the court accepting the responsibility and admitting her guilt.

“As painful as it is,” defense attorney William Portanova said after the hearing, with Papini accepting his sentence as part of his recovery.

He said the judge’s sentence “did not miss the mark” and was justified despite being “more than we wanted”.

“By the time he sentenced her, he knew her heart,” said Portanova.

Asked about the judge’s comment that Papini would still be lying if he hadn’t been caught, Portanova said, that when Papini came to his office, “he told us the truth, maybe not immediately but it was true.” “

, video below | Sherry Papini’s lawyer reacts after sentencing

Portanova had previously said that Papini was upset and disgraced and that she should spend most of her sentence at home. However, prosecutors said it was imperative that he spend his entire term in prison. The judge ordered him to report to jail on November 8.

Prosecutors Veronica Allegria and Shelley Weger wrote in their court filings, “Pappini’s abduction hoax was deliberate, well-planned and sophisticated.” And she was still falsely telling people that she was kidnapped months after pleading guilty in April to staging the kidnapping and lying to the FBI about it, they wrote.

Alegria said out of court on Monday that he agreed with the judge that “it is very important that we send a message to anyone who is or is thinking of lying to the FBI or other law enforcement officials.” That they can deceive the government and cause harm to the victims.”

“And I think it’s important that people know they can’t commit these crimes and get away with it scot-free,” she said.

Portanova wrote in her counter-court filing: “Outwardly endearing and endearing, yet capable of intense deceit … Ms. Papini’s chameleon personality inspired her to simultaneously long for family security and the freedom of youth “

So “in pursuit of a nonsensical imagination,” Portanova said, the married mother ran to an ex-boyfriend in Southern California, about 600 miles south of her home in Redding. When she said she wanted to go home, he dropped her off on Interstate 5, about 150 miles from her home.

Passersby found her with bindings on her body, a swollen nose, a hazy “brand” on her right shoulder, scratches and rashes on her body, ligature marks on her wrists and ankles, and a burning sensation on her left forearm. All injuries were self-inflicted and were designed to substantiate her story that she was abducted at gunpoint by two Hispanic women while she was out for a run.

Portanova wrote, the wounds were an expression of her “unstable malevolence” and “self-inflicted asceticism”. And once he began, “Each lie demanded another lie.”

Prosecutors said Papini’s moves not only harmed himself nor his family. “An entire community believed in fraud and lived in fear that Hispanic women were roaming the streets to kidnap and sell women,” he wrote.

Prosecutors agreed to seek a sentence at the lower end of the sentence in exchange for Papini’s plea of ​​guilty. It was estimated to be between eight and 14 months in custody, less than the maximum 25 years for the two charges.

She offered no rationale for her actions, which stunned even independent mental health experts, who said her actions did not correspond to any specific diagnosis.

“Papini’s painful early years twisted and cooled him in myriad ways,” said Portanova, arguing for home confinement. With his deception finally revealed, he said, “It is hard to imagine a more brutal public revelation of a person’s broken inner self. At this point, the punishment is already intense and feels like a life sentence. .

But prosecutors said his “past trauma and mental health issues alone cannot account for all of his actions.”

“Papini had planned the kidnapping with his deceit and had begun months in advance – it was not simply a response to a traumatic childhood,” he wrote.

Following his arrest in March, Papini received more than $30,000 worth of psychiatric care for anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder. He billed the state’s Victim Compensation Fund for the treatment, and now he must pay it back as part of his restitution.

As part of the plea agreement, she has agreed to reimburse law enforcement agencies more than $150,000 for the cost of her and her non-kidnappers’ search, and $50,000 in disability payments received since her return. 128,000 has been agreed to be paid.

, video below | Sherry Papini’s husband files for divorce

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