Prince William and Princess Kate are ‘considering taking 9-year-old George to the Queen’s funeral’

Senior palace advisers have asked the Prince and Princess of Wales to consider allowing Prince George to attend the State funeral of the Queen tomorrow because of the powerful symbolic message it would send.

At the tender age of nine, and having just overcome the daunting prospect of starting a new school, George is now the second in line to the throne.

With this in mind, aides have suggested it would be good for the public to see the young Prince – who affectionately called the Queen ‘Gan Gan’ – and is the future of the Monarchy.

One insider said: ‘Courtiers are keen for Prince George to be at the funeral in some capacity, if only to reassure the nation of the order of succession.’

Another palace source added: ‘It’s currently under discussion. No decision has been made yet.’

Senior palace advisers have asked the Prince and Princess of Wales to consider allowing Prince George to attend the State funeral of the Queen tomorrow because of the powerful symbolic message it would send

Prince George with his great-grandmother Queen Elizabeth II caught in an intimate moment where he turns to her and smiles during the Platinum Jubilee celebrations in June

Prince George with his great-grandmother Queen Elizabeth II caught in an intimate moment where he turns to her and smiles during the Platinum Jubilee celebrations in June

The children of the Prince and Princess of Wales have yet to be seen in public since the Queen’s death was announced on Thursday September 8.

Two of the late Queen’s other great-grandchildren, Mia and Lena Tindall, were at Westminster Hall on Friday for her lying-in-state. They were in the gallery with their parents Zara and Mike Tindall as their grandmother, Princess Anne, took her place alongside her three brothers for a silent vigil beside the Queen’s coffin.

There was no sign of George, Charlotte or Louis at last night’s vigil by the Queen’s grandchildren – and the Prince of Wales might have good reason to consider whether courtiers’ suggestions to involve a nine-year-old in tomorrow’s funeral are wise.

William spoke movingly last week about how walking behind his grandmother’s coffin as it left Buckingham Palace for the last time on Wednesday had evoked poignant memories of his mother Princess Diana’s funeral 25 years ago.

William and Harry, then 15 and 12, found their grief thrust into the public gaze when they followed Diana’s coffin along the same route down the Mall and Whitehall. It became one of the defining images of the day and left a lasting impact.

William has previously said it was ‘one of the hardest things I’ve ever done’, while Harry said: ‘I don’t think any child should be asked to do that, under any circumstances.’

Prince George tries his hand at making Christmas pudding under the watchful eye of his great-grandmother the Queen for a video broadcast on Christmas Day 2019

Prince George tries his hand at making Christmas pudding under the watchful eye of his great-grandmother the Queen for a video broadcast on Christmas Day 2019

Prince George, pictured as a toddler in 2015, looks at his great-grandmother as they share a moment outside of the church where Princess Charlotte was christened in Sandringham

Prince George, pictured as a toddler in 2015, looks at his great-grandmother as they share a moment outside of the church where Princess Charlotte was christened in Sandringham

Prince George, pictured next to his great-grandmother as a two-year-old wearing red shorts and an embroidered shirt as she looks down at him in a baby pink suit and matching hat

Prince George, pictured next to his great-grandmother as a two-year-old wearing red shorts and an embroidered shirt as she looks down at him in a baby pink suit and matching hat

William spoke movingly last week about how walking behind his grandmother’s coffin as it left Buckingham Palace for the last time on Wednesday had evoked poignant memories of his mother Princess Diana’s funeral 25 years ago

William spoke movingly last week about how walking behind his grandmother’s coffin as it left Buckingham Palace for the last time on Wednesday had evoked poignant memories of his mother Princess Diana’s funeral 25 years ago

Last week, William confided to well-wishers that reprising the ceremonial procession for his grandmother had been ‘challenging’ and ‘brought back a few memories’ – so he might be keen to protect his own children’s grief from the same public scrutiny.

It is anticipated that tomorrow’s proceedings will be watched by the biggest-ever global TV audience, and the inclusion of Prince George would attract particular attention. That said, the Prince and Princess of Wales have, in recent months, increasingly included their children in public events.

Prince George and Princess Charlotte, seven, played starring roles in the Platinum Jubilee celebrations this summer.

They accompanied their parents on a trip to Wales and were seen on the balcony at Buckingham Palace. Even four-year-old Prince Louis attended the Platinum Party at the Palace concert.

George was said to have a close relationship with his great-grandmother. The Queen marked his ninth birthday in July by sharing a picture of the pair together on the balcony at Buckingham Palace at the Jubilee weekend.

The Monarch’s official Instagram page featured the post: ‘Happy 9th Birthday Prince George!’ along with a celebratory cake emoji. Over the years she had proudly posted pictures at Christmas showing the direct line of succession, including one showing George stirring the Christmas pudding mixture as his father, grandfather and great-grandmother looked on.

Prince George and Princess Charlotte, seven, played starring roles in the Platinum Jubilee celebrations this summer

Prince George and Princess Charlotte, seven, played starring roles in the Platinum Jubilee celebrations this summer

Archie and Lilibet remain ‘at home’ with granny Doria 

While the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been at vigils in Westminster Hall this week and out receiving condolences from the public, their children, three-year-old Archie and 15-month-old Lilibet, are believed to have remained behind in America.

According to reports, they have been at the couple’s home in Montecito, California, under the care of nannies and the Duchess’s mother Doria Ragland. 

However, Doria, the only member of Meghan’s family to have attended her wedding, was seen out alone in Los Angeles on Friday, a two-hour drive from Harry and Meghan’s home.

Harry and Meghan had been on a whistlestop tour of the UK and Germany and had been due to fly back to the US after attending an awards ceremony on the day the Queen died at Balmoral. 

Their children are thought to have last been in Britain when they joined the late Queen at a private lunch in Windsor around the time of Lilibet’s first birthday in June.

While the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been at vigils in Westminster Hall this week and out receiving condolences from the public, their children, three-year-old Archie and 15-month-old Lilibet, are believed to have remained behind in America

While the Duke and Duchess of Sussex have been at vigils in Westminster Hall this week and out receiving condolences from the public, their children, three-year-old Archie and 15-month-old Lilibet, are believed to have remained behind in America

The past two weeks have been a whirlwind for Prince William and his young family, who have just settled into Adelaide Cottage on the Windsor Estate after moving from London. On September 7, George, Charlotte and Louis were seen attending their first day at Lambrook School, a £50,000-a-year co-education prep school set in 52 acres of Berkshire countryside.

The following morning, Prince William received the message that his grandmother was gravely ill. He joined his aunt and uncles to fly to Balmoral Castle to be with the Queen while Kate decided to stay in Windsor to be with the children.

On the Friday, King Charles made his eldest son and daughter-in-law the Prince and Princess of Wales. As heir to the throne, William has also inherited the Duchy of Cornwall and all the responsibilities which come with running the huge commercial estate.

While the public has yet to see the young Wales children since the Queen’s death, William and Kate have given some indication as to how their children are coping.

The new Princess of Wales told one well-wisher: ‘They’re in school, being well looked after. They’re in a routine and they’re happy. They’re with new friends.’

Prince William said the children were ‘OK’, adding: ‘They’re settling in. We’re trying to keep everything constant and settled for them.’

When a member of the public said: ‘They must be talking about it in school’, William responded: ‘They are. There’s a lot of talking.’

On Saturday evening, the Queen’s eight grandchildren – including Prince Harry in his military uniform – stood by her coffin in her honour as she lay in state in Westminster Hall as weeping mourners filed past tonight.

Queen Elizabeth’s grandchildren Prince William, the Prince of Wales, Prince Harry, Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, Zara Tindall and Peter Phillips, Lady Louise Windsor and James, Viscount Severn, arrived just before 6pm where they held a 15-minute vigil.

Brothers William and Harry – both dressed in uniform – stood guard at the Queen’s lying in state in Westminster Hall on Saturday evening as a stream of mourners filed past after queueing for hours.

Prince Harry, who saw action on the front line during two tours of duty in Afghanistan, has previously been denied the chance to wear his military uniform as he publicly mourns, because he is no longer a working royal.

But royal sources said the King decided his youngest son could wear uniform for the vigil.

Despite being a former Army officer, Harry has been in civilian dress for official events this week, including walking behind the Queen’s coffin on Wednesday.

On Saturday evening, Prince Harry was wearing the Blues and Royals, No.1 Uniform, KCVO Neck Order and Star, Afghanistan Operational Service Medal, Golden, Diamond and Platinum Jubilee medals and Army Pilot Wings.

Prince William was wearing the Blues and Royals, No.1 Uniform, The Garter Sash, The Garter Star, Golden, Diamond and Platinum Jubilee medals and RAF Pilot Wings.

The brothers were joined in their silent tribute around the coffin by cousins Zara Tindall and Peter Phillips, Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie, and Lady Louise Windsor and her brother Viscount Severn.

The young royals, led by Prince William, were in position at the top of the grand committee staircase in the corner of the vast hall at 5.58pm.

At 6pm, the tapping which signifies the changing of the guard sounded and William began walking down the steps, one at a time, followed by Harry, then Beatrice and Eugenie side by side, Louise and James side by side, and Zara and Peter also side by side.

Silence fell as members of the public looked on, with the only sound being the grandchildren’s footsteps on the stone.

Prince William was positioned at one end of the coffin, facing the north entrance, while Harry was positioned at the opposite end, facing the area of the hall where thousands of people have entered over the last few days.

The Prince of Wales stood with his hands clasped in front and his head bowed.

Louise and James’s parents, the Earl and Countess of Wessex, looked on from a platform facing the coffin.

Members of the public continued to file past while the Queen’s grandchildren stood guard, with some women wiping tears away from their face as they left the hall.

At 6.15pm, the tapping sounded and the grandchildren ended their vigil.

Prince William led the group away from the coffin, followed by Zara and Peter, Louise and James, Beatrice and Eugenie, and finally Harry.

Queen Elizabeth II 's grandchildren (clockwise from front centre) the Prince of Wales, Peter Phillips, James, Viscount Severn, Princess Eugenie, the Duke of Sussex, Princess Beatrice, Lady Louise Windsor and Zara Tindall hold a vigil

Queen Elizabeth II ‘s grandchildren (clockwise from front centre) the Prince of Wales, Peter Phillips, James, Viscount Severn, Princess Eugenie, the Duke of Sussex, Princess Beatrice, Lady Louise Windsor and Zara Tindall hold a vigil

The eight sombre grandchildren arrived at Westminster Hall where they performed a vigil at the Queen's coffin

The eight sombre grandchildren arrived at Westminster Hall where they performed a vigil at the Queen’s coffin 

Queen Elizabeth's grandchildren arrived in Westminster just before 6pm where they will hold a 15-minute vigil

Queen Elizabeth’s grandchildren arrived in Westminster just before 6pm where they will hold a 15-minute vigil

Prince William bows his head as he stands beside his grandmother's coffin in Westminster Hall

Prince William bows his head as he stands beside his grandmother’s coffin in Westminster Hall

The Prince of Wales (right) and the Duke of Sussex before holding a vigil beside the coffin of their grandmother

The Prince of Wales (right) and the Duke of Sussex before holding a vigil beside the coffin of their grandmother

The Queen's eight grandchildren carried out a vigil at her coffin on Saturday evening in the Palace of Westminster

The Queen’s eight grandchildren carried out a vigil at her coffin on Saturday evening in the Palace of Westminster 

The Queen's four grandchildren stand around her coffin during their own vigil, similar to the one held by their parents on Friday

The Queen’s four grandchildren stand around her coffin during their own vigil, similar to the one held by their parents on Friday

Mourners watched as the vigil was held for the Queen in Westminster Hall by her eight grandchildren on Saturday evening

Mourners watched as the vigil was held for the Queen in Westminster Hall by her eight grandchildren on Saturday evening 

Mourners are continuing to file past the coffin as the royal cousins stand beside their late grandmother's coffin

Mourners are continuing to file past the coffin as the royal cousins stand beside their late grandmother’s coffin 

The Queen's grandchildren stand in solemn silence as they mount a vigil for their late grandmother in Westminster Hall

The Queen’s grandchildren stand in solemn silence as they mount a vigil for their late grandmother in Westminster Hall 

The Prince of Wales stands vigil beside the coffin of his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, as it lies in state in Westminster Hall

The Prince of Wales stands vigil beside the coffin of his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, as it lies in state in Westminster Hall

The Duke of Sussex wore the Blues and Royals No.1 Uniform, the KCVO Neck Order and Star, Afghanistan Operational Service Medal, Golden, Diamond and Platinum Jubilee medals and Army Pilot Wings

The Duke of Sussex wore the Blues and Royals No.1 Uniform, the KCVO Neck Order and Star, Afghanistan Operational Service Medal, Golden, Diamond and Platinum Jubilee medals and Army Pilot Wings

The brothers wore military uniform at the Saturday evening vigil for their grandmother, the late monarch, Queen Elizabeth II

The brothers wore military uniform at the Saturday evening vigil for their grandmother, the late monarch, Queen Elizabeth II

From left, Zara Tindall, Lady Louise Windsor and Princess Beatrice hold a vigil in Westminster Hall, London

From left, Zara Tindall, Lady Louise Windsor and Princess Beatrice hold a vigil in Westminster Hall, London

Princess Eugenie of York mount a vigil around the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II in Westminster Hall on Saturday evening

Princess Eugenie of York mount a vigil around the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II in Westminster Hall on Saturday evening 

Lady Louise Windsor and Princess Eugenie of York during a vigil for their grandmother in Westminster Hall on Saturday evening

Lady Louise Windsor and Princess Eugenie of York during a vigil for their grandmother in Westminster Hall on Saturday evening

Zara Tindall, Lady Louise Windsor and Princess Beatrice of York at Saturday evening's vigil in Westminster Hall

Zara Tindall, Lady Louise Windsor and Princess Beatrice of York at Saturday evening’s vigil in Westminster Hall 

Queen Elizabeth II 's grandchildren Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, James, Viscount Severn and Princess Eugenie inside Westminster Hall

Queen Elizabeth II ‘s grandchildren Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, James, Viscount Severn and Princess Eugenie inside Westminster Hall

Peter Phillips and James, Viscount Severn hold a vigil in honour of Queen Elizabeth II at Westminster Hall on Saturday evening

Peter Phillips and James, Viscount Severn hold a vigil in honour of Queen Elizabeth II at Westminster Hall on Saturday evening

Zara Tindall, Lady Louise, Princess Beatrice, the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Sussex, Princess Eugenie, Viscount Severn and Peter Phillips hold a vigil beside the coffin

Zara Tindall, Lady Louise, Princess Beatrice, the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Sussex, Princess Eugenie, Viscount Severn and Peter Phillips hold a vigil beside the coffin

Inside Westminster Hall, mourners watched on as the vigil was held at the late Queen's coffin in Westminster Hall

Inside Westminster Hall, mourners watched on as the vigil was held at the late Queen’s coffin in Westminster Hall

Mourners watched on as the Queen's grandchildren stood around her coffin in Westminster Hall on Saturday evening

Mourners watched on as the Queen’s grandchildren stood around her coffin in Westminster Hall on Saturday evening 

From left: Zara Tindall, Lady Louise, Princess Beatrice, the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Sussex, Princess Eugenie, Viscount Severn and Peter Phillips hold a vigil

From left: Zara Tindall, Lady Louise, Princess Beatrice, the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Sussex, Princess Eugenie, Viscount Severn and Peter Phillips hold a vigil

The cousins performed the vigil at their grandmother's coffin on Saturday evening at the Palace of Westminster, London

The cousins performed the vigil at their grandmother’s coffin on Saturday evening at the Palace of Westminster, London

The Prince of Wales looked sombre as he led the vigil for his late grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, in Westminster Hall

The Prince of Wales looked sombre as he led the vigil for his late grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, in Westminster Hall

The grandchildren arriving at Westminster Hall where they held a vigil for the Queen in Westminster Hall, London

The grandchildren arriving at Westminster Hall where they held a vigil for the Queen in Westminster Hall, London

Prince William leads the group of eight through Westminster Hall to the coffin on Saturday evening in Westminster Hall

Prince William leads the group of eight through Westminster Hall to the coffin on Saturday evening in Westminster Hall

Well-wishers look on in the background as the royal cousins walked into Westminster Hall on Saturday evening

Well-wishers look on in the background as the royal cousins walked into Westminster Hall on Saturday evening 

The Prince of Wales leads the group of eight to the catafalque in Westminster Hall, London, on Saturday evening

The Prince of Wales leads the group of eight to the catafalque in Westminster Hall, London, on Saturday evening 

The royal cousins carried out the vigil in a similar way to their parents on Friday evening, which King Charles took part in

The royal cousins carried out the vigil in a similar way to their parents on Friday evening, which King Charles took part in 

The Duke of Sussex holds a vigil beside the coffin of his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, in Westminster Hall

The Duke of Sussex holds a vigil beside the coffin of his grandmother, Queen Elizabeth II, in Westminster Hall 

The Duke of Sussex wore the Blues and Royals No.1 Uniform, the KCVO Neck Order and Star, Afghanistan Operational Service Medal, Golden, Diamond and Platinum Jubilee medals and Army Pilot Wings

Prince Harry was wearing military uniform at the vigil

The Duke of Sussex wore the Blues and Royals No.1 Uniform, the KCVO Neck Order and Star, Afghanistan Operational Service Medal, Golden, Diamond and Platinum Jubilee medals and Army Pilot Wings

The Duke of Sussex, Viscount Severn and Princess Eugenie hold a vigil beside the coffin of their grandmother

The Duke of Sussex, Viscount Severn and Princess Eugenie hold a vigil beside the coffin of their grandmother

The cousins walked around the catafalque as they took their places for the vigil at the Palace of Westminster, London

The cousins walked around the catafalque as they took their places for the vigil at the Palace of Westminster, London

Sophie, Countess of Wessex and Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex at the vigil in honour of Queen Elizabeth II

Sophie, Countess of Wessex and Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex at the vigil in honour of Queen Elizabeth II

The Earl and Countess of Wessex watch their children, nieces and nephews carry out a vigil for the Queen

The Earl and Countess of Wessex watch their children, nieces and nephews carry out a vigil for the Queen

The Earl and Countess of Wessex watching the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Sussex, Peter Phillips, Zara Tindall, Princess Eugenie, Princess Beatrice, Lady Louise and Viscount Severn hold a vigil beside the coffin of their grandmother

The Earl and Countess of Wessex watching the Prince of Wales, the Duke of Sussex, Peter Phillips, Zara Tindall, Princess Eugenie, Princess Beatrice, Lady Louise and Viscount Severn hold a vigil beside the coffin of their grandmother

The Countess of Wessex looked struck with grief as she watched her children perform a vigil at their late grandmother's coffin

The Countess of Wessex looked struck with grief as she watched her children perform a vigil at their late grandmother’s coffin

Sophie, Countess of Wessex and Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, watched the vigil on Saturday evening in Westminster Hall

Sophie, Countess of Wessex and Prince Edward, Earl of Wessex, watched the vigil on Saturday evening in Westminster Hall 

The royals stood around the Queen's coffin in Westminster Hall during a vigil on Saturday evening

The royals stood around the Queen’s coffin in Westminster Hall during a vigil on Saturday evening 

Mourners continued to file past as they royals mounted a vigil around their late grandmother's coffin

Mourners continued to file past as they royals mounted a vigil around their late grandmother’s coffin 

People arrive to pay their respects as they pass the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II

People arrive to pay their respects as they pass the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II

Prince William, the Prince of Wales, looked sombre as he stood silently at his grandmother's coffin

Prince William, the Prince of Wales, looked sombre as he stood silently at his grandmother’s coffin 

The royal cousins, some in all black, others in military uniform, took part in the mournful display on Saturday evening

The royal cousins, some in all black, others in military uniform, took part in the mournful display on Saturday evening 

Prince William, Prince of Wales, Peter Phillips, Zara Tindall, James, Viscount Severn, Britain's Princess Eugenie of York, Britain's Lady Louise Windsor, Britain's Princess Beatrice of York and Britain's Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, depart having held a vigil around the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II

Prince William, Prince of Wales, Peter Phillips, Zara Tindall, James, Viscount Severn, Britain’s Princess Eugenie of York, Britain’s Lady Louise Windsor, Britain’s Princess Beatrice of York and Britain’s Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, depart having held a vigil around the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II

Prince of Wales leaves the Houses of Parliament after attending a vigil for his late grandmother

Prince of Wales leaves the Houses of Parliament after attending a vigil for his late grandmother 

As the group made their way back up the corner staircase, Zara bent down to retrieve one of her shoes which appeared to have slipped off.

As the royals returned to their cars, Zara appeared to be linking arms with Harry, while Peter, Louise and Beatrice were walking along together.

Speaking to Sky News, three well-wishers said that it was ‘wonderful’ to see the vigil.

Jane said: ‘I was well worth coming back to this country for. I felt that I wanted to be, I’ve come from France, so I felt I really wanted to be here, and to have them there as well at the same time was just incredible.’

Shirley, said it was a ‘very emotional’ experience. 

‘I really want to come, I said I’ve got to because she’s done such wonderful things in the 70 years,’ she said.

‘And even though I’m decrepit as it were, I thought “I’m going to make it by Jove I’m going to get here”. 

‘At first I thought I was going to be very strong, but once I got past the coffin it was extremely emotional, and I’ve been trying to hold it back since — even now.’

Valerie, who was also with the group, added: ‘It was wonderful to see them, we didn’t think that we would. We thought that they were coming later this evening.

‘When they were there it was absolutely incredible, it’s been a wonderful day and we were really really pleased that we did it, especially as we got up at 4.30am this morning to actually make it.’

Edward added: ‘Majestic is the only real word that does it justice. really, really powerful to see them standing there so still and quiet, and the Princes very professional of course.’ 

Last night, King Charles and his siblings, Princess Anne and Princes Andrew and Edward mounted their touching final vigil for the Queen, before the late-monarch is laid to rest on Monday.

They were all dressed in uniform, with an exception made for disgraced Andrew, who is no longer a working royal, to wear his military uniform as a ‘special mark of respect’ for the Queen. 

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Britain’s Prince Harry arrives to attend a vigil as they pay their respects to the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II

Prince William, Prince of Wales, arrives at the Palace of Westminster to attend a vigil for his grandmother

Prince William, Prince of Wales, arrives at the Palace of Westminster to attend a vigil for his grandmother

A woman cries after paying her respects by the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II inside Westminster Hall

A woman cries after paying her respects by the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II inside Westminster Hall

A man bows his head to the floor as he pays his respects to the late monarch in Westminster Hall

A man bows his head to the floor as he pays his respects to the late monarch in Westminster Hall 

King Charles and his family held a vigil in honour of the Queen. Alongside siblings Anne, Andrew and Edward, the newly crowned monarch stood guard beside his mother's coffin (pictured)

King Charles and his family held a vigil in honour of the Queen. Alongside siblings Anne, Andrew and Edward, the newly crowned monarch stood guard beside his mother’s coffin (pictured)

King Charles and his siblings Princess Anne and Princes Andrew and Edward mounted their touching final vigil for the Queen, before the late monarch is laid to rest on Monday

King Charles and his siblings Princess Anne and Princes Andrew and Edward mounted their touching final vigil for the Queen, before the late monarch is laid to rest on Monday

King Charles, Anne, Princess Royal, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward attend a vigil, following the death of the Queen

King Charles, Anne, Princess Royal, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward attend a vigil, following the death of the Queen

Mourners watch on as King Charles and his three siblings perform the Vigil of the Children beside the Queen's coffin at Westminster Hall on Friday

Mourners watch on as King Charles and his three siblings perform the Vigil of the Children beside the Queen’s coffin at Westminster Hall on Friday 

Now mourners sell used wristbands for up to £350

Some people have been cashing in on the Queen’s lying in state by selling used wristbands for up to £350.

Those joining the queue receive coloured wristbands to mark their place – so they can leave for a drink, or to go to the toilet, and then return.

But it appears that some mourners have seen the system as an opportunity to make some cash by selling the wristbands as souvenirs on eBay. 

One person has listed an orange wristband, which features the abbreviation LISQ (Lying In State Queue), with an asking price of £350.

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Small print on the paper band specifies that it does not guarantee entry and is strictly non-transferable. But in the description the seller has listed it as ‘brand new’ and ‘never been used’.

Another seller has listed a similar wristband for £100, while a third person is selling a yellow band – plus a bundle of commemorative newspapers – for £122. A fourth seller has put their ripped green band on the site for £100.

The item was accompanied by the description: ‘Previously used or worn orange wristband from the first 24 hours of the Queen Laying-In-State in Westminster Hall. This wristband gained entry to the original wearer to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth.

‘This is a piece of history. A small piece yet still a piece of history and this is your chance to own it if you did not have the chance to come yourself.

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‘The queue to pay respects to the Queen Lying-In-State may be London’s longest. It took 7-8 hours from joining the queue to finally pay respects to the late Queen.’

The seller said they were happy to send the item internationally but specified that it was being sold as ‘historical memorabilia only.’

They stressed that 50 per cent of the final profit will be donated to the British Red Cross which Queen Elizabeth was the longest serving patron of.

Another person is trying to flog their orange wristband for the slightly lower price of £82.

The cheapest band currently listed on the site is up for grabs for £10.

The seller promised to donate 20 per cent of the final price to The Dogs Trust to reflect the Queen’s love of animals.

Official guidance published by the government states: ‘When you reach the back of the queue, you will be given a coloured and numbered wristband.

‘This is a record of when you joined the queue, however please note that having a wristband does not guarantee your entry to the Lying-in-State.

‘Wristbands are specific to each person joining the queue, and are strictly non-transferable. You must keep this wristband on at all times as it will be checked along the route.

‘Your wristband also allows you to leave the queue for a short period to use a toilet or get refreshments, then return to your place in the queue.’

As tearful mourners watched on, the Queen’s four children stood guard of their mother’s coffin for more than 10 minutes at Westminster Hall on Friday evening. The siblings each guarded a side of the coffin, with Charles, dressed in a Navy Admiral uniform, standing at the head.

It was their second, and final, vigil for the beloved monarch. Known as the ‘Vigil of the Children’ – an honor dating back to the time of George V – it mirrors a previous event held earlier this week at St Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh.

However, unlike the previous vigil in which Charles donned a kilt and Andrew a morning suit, all four siblings were dressed in military colors.

This afternoon, Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie have paid a moving, heartfelt tribute addressed to the Queen, saying: ‘Goodbye dear Grannie, it has been the honour of our lives to have been your granddaughters.’

The sisters, in a written message released as they prepared to mount a vigil around the late monarch’s coffin, thanked their grandmother for ‘making us laugh, for including us, for picking heather and raspberries, for marching soldiers, for our teas, for comfort, for joy’.

Beatrice and Eugenie said they missed the Queen terribly and thanked her for being ‘the loving hand on our backs leading us through this world’, adding: ‘We, like many, thought you’d be here forever.’

The princesses – the daughters of the Duke of York and Sarah, Duchess of York – shared the grief they have felt since the death of the Queen at Balmoral nine days ago.

They said: ‘Our dearest Grannie, We’ve not been able to put much into words since you left us all.

‘There have been tears and laughter, silences and chatter, hugs and loneliness, and a collective loss for you, our beloved Queen and our beloved Grannie.

‘We, like many, thought you’d be here forever. And we all miss you terribly.

‘You were our matriarch, our guide, our loving hand on our backs leading us through this world. You taught us so much and we will cherish those lessons and memories forever.’

Like the Queen’s other grandchildren, the princesses shared happy summers with the late monarch in the Scottish Highlands as the royals gathered each year on the Balmoral estate.

‘For now dear Grannie, all we want to say is thank you. Thank you for making us laugh, for including us, for picking heather and raspberries, for marching soldiers, for our teas, for comfort, for joy,’ they said.

They added, in a nod to the Queen’s modesty: ‘You, being you, will never know the impact you have had on our family and so many people around the world.’

Beatrice and Eugenie spoke of the Queen being reunited with her husband of 73 years the Duke of Edinburgh who died just 17 months ago.

‘We’re so happy you’re back with Grandpa. Goodbye dear Grannie, it has been the honour of our lives to have been your granddaughters and we’re so very proud of you,’ they said.

They also hailed their ‘dear Uncle Charles’ in his new role as monarch.

‘We know that dear Uncle Charles, the King, will continue to lead in your example as he too has dedicated his life to service. God save the King,’ the sisters said.

The princesses ended their message to the Queen with the words: ‘With our love, Beatrice and Eugenie.’

Yesterday, the Duke of York, was given special dispensation to wear uniform at the vigil, as a ‘final mark of respect’ for his mother.

He was stripped of his armed forces patronages earlier this year amid a sexual abuse lawsuit in the United States, allegations he denied, had previously been banned from wearing military colours at public events.

He wore the full military dress uniform of a Vice Admiral of the Navy, a title which he earned from his years serving in the Navy – including in the Falklands War.

Members of the royal family including James, Viscount Severn, Lady Louise Windsor, the Countess of Wessex, Jack Brooksbank, the Queen Consort, Vice Admiral Sir Tim Laurence, Zara Tindall, Mike Tindall, the Duke of Kent, Mia and Lena Tindall, the Duchess of Gloucester, and the Earl and Countess of St Andrews all attended Friday night’s vigil. 

Mourners console one another in Westminster Hall as they pay a final tribute to Queen Elizabeth II

Mourners console one another in Westminster Hall as they pay a final tribute to Queen Elizabeth II

Hundreds of thousands of people have joined the queue to see the Queen, despite warnings it could take them 24 hours to get to the front

Hundreds of thousands of people have joined the queue to see the Queen, despite warnings it could take them 24 hours to get to the front 

Many mourners have become overwhelmed with emotion as they paid their respects to Britain's longest-serving monarch

Many mourners have become overwhelmed with emotion as they paid their respects to Britain’s longest-serving monarch

Many shed tears as they left Westminster Hall today, bidding farewell to the Queen ahead of her funeral on Monday

Many shed tears as they left Westminster Hall today, bidding farewell to the Queen ahead of her funeral on Monday

Many shed tears as they left Westminster Hall today, bidding farewell to the Queen ahead of her funeral on Monday 

A woman reacts as members of the public file past the coffin

People leave the Palace of Westminster in London, after viewing the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II

Thousands have found themselves overwhelmed with emotion after leaving Westminster Hall – with most having waited more than 12 hours

Members of the public view the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II

Members of the public view the coffin of Queen Elizabeth II

Thousands of mourners have been overcome with emotion as they bid a final farewell to Queen Elizabeth II as she lies in state in Westminster Hall. 

Vast numbers of people have been queuing since the Queen was moved from Buckingham Palace to the Palace of Westminster on Wednesday, with the government warning it could take them 24 hours to get to the front. 

Tearful tributes have been paid at the late monarch’s lying-in-state as the British public thank the Queen for her 70 years of service on the throne. 

Many consoled each other as raw emotion was on display following the Queen’s death at the age of 96 last Thursday.  

The line, which stretches from Westminster Hall all the way to Southwark Park in south London, is thought to be the world’s longest queue, and can even be seen from space. 

The queue potentially even eclipses the 30,000 Russians who waited to get inside the USSR’s first McDonald’s restaurant when it finally opened on January 31, 1990 after the end of the Cold War. 

Wait times stretched to more than 25 hours overnight as thousands of mourners wrapped up so they could keep warm, the BBC even produced a tongue-in-cheek weather forecast for the queue just before 7am this morning – a crisp 7C, while other parts of the UK hit freezing.

At about 1.15am today, the Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport’s (DCMS) online tracker said the expected wait time was at least 25 hours as people queued from Southwark Park in south-east London to pay their respects to the Queen’s coffin in Westminster Hall, about five miles away. At around 7.20am, the tracker said mourners would have to wait at least 24 hours and warned people not to travel to join the queue – and to check back later on Saturday. 

However, by 8am the Government had said that the end point of the queue was once more accessible in Southwark Park. At 10am, the DCMS online tracker said the expected wait time was around 16 hours – then at 1pm this fell further to 14 hours.

Undeterred by the extreme waiting times or cold weather, a steady stream of people continued to join the queue last night.  Paul, a 49-year-old Scout Leader called his 13-hour wait to pay his respects to the Queen ‘brilliant’ and was adamant he would do it all again without hesitation.

‘The sense of camaraderie was amazing, we’ve made friends for life. Everybody was handing out sweets and cakes and singing,’ he said.

The queue begins on the Albert Embankment, along Belvedere Road, behind the London Eye, then crosses Lambeth Bridge and travels along the South Bank past the National Theatre, Tate Modern and HMS Belfast, before ending in Southwark Park. 

Members of the public continue to wait in line to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth II lying-in-state

Members of the public continue to wait in line to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth II lying-in-state

A huge queue files near Tower Bridge this morning as mourners wait to see the Queen lying-in-state

A huge queue files near Tower Bridge this morning as mourners wait to see the Queen lying-in-state

‘It means an awful lot that you’re all here’: Prince William thanks mourners (and Paddington Bear) queueing to see Queen on surprise walkabout with King Charles  

The Prince of Wales has thanked mourners queuing 14 hours to see the Queen’s coffin lying-in-state at the Palace of Westminster on a surprise walkabout alongside his father King Charles III – after shaking hands and talking to hundreds of royal fans this afternoon.

Prince William and Britain’s new monarch greeted hundreds of people along the South Bank near Lambeth Bridge in London earlier today ahead of the Queen’s state funeral on Monday, to cheers of  ‘hip hip hooray’ and ‘God Save the King’ as they passed by.

Many took photographs and pressed against the metal barriers, eager to exchange a word with the King and the heir to the throne as they shook hands with those closest.

William later thanked royal fans for queueing for 14 hours to pay their respects to his grandmother, tweeting: ‘It mean an awful lot that you’re all here’.

One lady offered Charles condolences as he shook her hand, and another shouted: ‘I can’t believe this’ – while a third presented the two royals with a Paddington Bear toy, in reference to the Queen’s Platinum Jubilee sketch with the beloved children’s character.

As the prince shook the hands of mourners, he said: ‘It means an awful lot you’re here. She [the Queen] would never believe this. You’ll make some friends for life [those who have met in crowd’. Revealing that his wife Kate Middleton and children George, Charlotte and Louis were ‘ok’ and ‘all united in grief’, William also said that he became emotional seeing his grandmother’s corgis, adding: ‘They are being looked after – they have gone to a very good home’. 

Several people cried after meeting the Prince of Wales, and one woman told him: ‘You’ll be a brilliant king one day’. 

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to see the Queen lying-in-state earlier this afternoon alongside his father, King Charles

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to see the Queen lying-in-state earlier this afternoon alongside his father, King Charles

The Prince of Wales thanked mourners queuing 14 hours to see the Queen's coffin lying-in-state at the Palace of Westminster

The Prince of Wales thanked mourners queuing 14 hours to see the Queen’s coffin lying-in-state at the Palace of Westminster

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to see the Queen lying-in-state earlier this afternoon alongside his father, King Charles

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to see the Queen lying-in-state earlier this afternoon alongside his father, King Charles

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to the Queen lying-in-state at Westminster Hall earlier this afternoon

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to the Queen lying-in-state at Westminster Hall earlier this afternoon

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to the Queen in London

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to the Queen in London

Earlier the royals met London Mayor Sadiq Khan, a curtseying Home Secretary Suella Braverman and London’s Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Mark Rowley at Scotland Yard’s special operations. During the visit today in Lambeth, the King also met police staff, who he thanked for their planning and delivery of policing in the days leading up to his mother’s funeral, as well as workers at London Ambulance Service, London Fire Brigade, Transport for London and the Army. 

The King concluded his tour of the home nations yesterday, starting his day with a visit to Wales, after trips to Northern Ireland and Scotland in recent days. 

Final preparations are under way for the funeral in two days, with 2,000 VIPs – from world leaders Joe Biden, Emmanuel Macron and Jacinda Ardern to royals including Japanese Emperor Naruhito and Empress Masako, Belgium’s King Philippe and Queen Mathilde, Spain’s King Felipe and Queen Letizia, Sweden’s King Carl XVI Gustaf and Queen Silvia and the Netherlands’ King Willem-Alexander and Queen Maxima – expected to arrive throughout the weekend.

It comes after the King and his siblings last night held a silent vigil in Westminster Hall to pay a moving tribute to their beloved mother. 

King Charles is presented with a Paddington Bear as he meets well-wishers in London - with some carrying Paddington Bear yous

King Charles is presented with a Paddington Bear as he meets well-wishers in London – with some carrying Paddington Bear yous 

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to the Queen - most of which were waiting for around 14 hours to see the lying-in-state ceremony

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to the Queen – most of which were waiting for around 14 hours to see the lying-in-state ceremony

King Charles and William, Prince of Wales visit Metropolitan Police Headquarters earlier on Saturday morning

King Charles and William, Prince of Wales visit Metropolitan Police Headquarters earlier on Saturday morning

King Charles and William, Prince of Wales visit Metropolitan Police Headquarters earlier on Saturday morning

King Charles and William, Prince of Wales visit Metropolitan Police Headquarters earlier on Saturday morning

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to the Queen lying-in-state at Westminster Hall

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to the Queen lying-in-state at Westminster Hall

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to the late Queen

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to the late Queen

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

Prince William greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

Prince William greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

King Charles greets people queueing to pay their respects to Queen Elizabeth

King Charles meets excited royal fans queueing along the banks of the Thames

King Charles meets excited royal fans queueing along the banks of the Thames

King Charles shakes the hands of well-wishers as he goes on a surprise walkabout with his son Prince William

King Charles shakes the hands of well-wishers as he goes on a surprise walkabout with his son Prince William

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to the late Queen

William, Prince of Wales greets people queueing to pay their respects to the late Queen

Prince William and his father King Charles left the walkabout to cheers of 'God Save The King' and hoorays while members of the public took out their phones to picture the moment

Prince William and his father King Charles left the walkabout to cheers of ‘God Save The King’ and hoorays while members of the public took out their phones to picture the moment

Sophie Wessex and Prince Edward greet royal well-wishers outside Buckingham Palace ahead of Queen’s funeral on Monday 

The Countess of Wessex cuddled a baby on a surprise and brought smiles to the faces of hundreds of well-wishers gathered outside Buckingham Palace with her husband today – after the beloved couple said the Royal Family had been ‘overwhelmed by the tide of emotion’ following the Queen’s death.

Royal fans applauded Sophie and Prince Edward and told them ‘sorry for your loss’ as the couple shook the hands of dozens of mourners outside the palace gates this afternoon – shortly after King Charles III and the Prince of Wales met mourners queueing along the banks of the River Thames to see the Queen lying-in-state at the Palace of Westminster.

The Queen’s youngest son could be heard asking mourners where they had come from and whether they were making their way to Green Park to lay flowers. He then told them that the Queen would ‘appreciate’ the number of people paying their respects – while his wife was given bouquets and a stuffed toy as she shook hands with those gathered.

The Countess stopped to look at one young girl’s T-shirt, which was printed with photos of the Queen through the decades of her reign. Sophie collected armfuls of flowers including sunflowers and roses, and was given paper tributes to the late monarch by some of the well-wishers.

The couple also walked over to meet members of the public stood behind barriers on the edge of nearby Green Park.

In an emotional statement released just hours before he attended a poignant vigil with his siblings the King, the Duke of York and the Princess Royal in Westminster Hall last night, the Earl of Wessex said: ‘As a family, we have grown up learning to share our parents, especially our beloved mama, with the nation, her realms and the Commonwealth.

‘While it has been lovely to have spent time saying our own farewell privately at Balmoral, it is now time to allow others to be able to say their farewell.’

The King told officers it is ‘encouraging’ that policing plans for Operation London Bridge are working during a visit to a Metropolitan Police base. 

Charles was given a tour of the Metropolitan Police Service Special Operations Room on Saturday, where he met and thanked emergency service workers for their efforts ahead of the funeral of the Queen and over the last nine days.

The Prince of Wales also briefly visited the Lambeth HQ, where he spoke to two police officers and thanked them for their service before departing in the same car as the King.

The pair later undertook a walkabout where they spoke to members of the public who were stood in the queue near Lambeth Palace to see the Queen’s coffin.

During the visit to the police headquarters, the King was greeted on arrival in south London by Met Police Commissioner Sir Mark Rowley, Home Secretary Suella Braverman, mayor of London Sadiq Khan and Lord Lieutenant of Greater London Sir Ken Olisa before being given his tour by Sir Mark.

As his vehicle arrived, members of the public lined the streets and cheered, with several shouting ‘God save the King’ as he stepped out of his car.

During the visit, the King met and spoke with several police officers involved in the planning for Operation London Bridge, the codename for the plans put in place following the death of the Queen, as well as members of British Transport Police, London Ambulance Service, the Army and London Fire Brigade.

He was seen laughing and joking with staff and asked several questions to each worker about their role in the operation and thanked them for their service.

While speaking to the operation planning team, who also prepare the policing efforts at football matches and protests in the capital, the King asked them questions relating to the planning around Operation London Bridge.

He asked the officers: ‘Have you been planning for a long time… or have you just been drafted in?’

One officer responded: ‘Yes your Majesty, we’ve been planning for about three years. There were teams before us.’

He replied: ‘And the plans are working?’

The officer said: ‘They are, absolutely.’

‘That’s the most encouraging thing,’ the King said, and began to chuckle.

He also questioned the staff about crime levels during the mourning period.

Referring to his time visiting the base, the King added: ‘It’s nice to know where it all happens. I’ve been here before – this is the absolute hub, isn’t it?’

The officers replied that it was. The King then described their work as ‘absolutely fantastic’, adding: ‘Thank you’.

After the King’s visit, Mr Khan said it was ‘lovely’ to see him be ‘incredibly inquisitive’ with staff.

He told journalists: ‘He was really keen to see for himself the hard work to keep our city safe, to keep His Majesty safe, the royal family safe, also there’ll be hundreds of leaders from across the globe coming to London.

‘It was lovely to have the King show that much interest. He went around meeting people, asking questions, listening to their answers, being incredibly inquisitive but also incredibly warm.

‘What’s remarkable about His Majesty the King is at a time when he is grieving, he’s going about his business and leading from the front.

‘I know from speaking to police officers from London, from across the country who are here helping us out, speaking to staff and other members of the team, how grateful they are for His Majesty to give up his time and come here today. Charles left before William, both of them in cars surrounded by police vehicles. 

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