King Charles III: royal family, including Anne, Andrew and Edward, greet wellwishers at Balmoral – live

Royal family meets wellwishers outside Balmoral

Members of the Royal family have left Crathie Kirk near Balmoral after a service to meet members of the public.

Prince Andrew, the Duke of York, was seen speaking to crowds, as did Princess Anne, the Princess Royal who was walking alongside her husband, Commander Timothy Laurence.

Anne’s children, Peter Phillips and Zara Tindall, were seen looking at floral tributes.

Prince Andrew put his glasses on before bending down to read some of the messages that had been left. He then moved across and put his arm around his daughter, Princess Eugenie, who could be seen drying her eyes and hugging her father while looking at the flowers.

“We’ve been allowed one day, now we start the process of handing her on,” Prince Andrew told the public, according to PA Media.

After moments reading the cards and memorials that had been left, the dozen-or-so members of the family paused in the gateway of Balmoral and turned to wave and thank the crowds who had gathered behind barriers.

Princess Anne views tributes with Edward, Earl of Wessex; Timothy Laurence, Peter Phillips and Zara Tindall. Photograph: Hannah McKay/Reuters
Prince Andrew inspects floral tributes outside Balmoral.
Prince Andrew inspects floral tributes outside Balmoral. Photograph: Phil Noble/Reuters

Key events

Donna Ferguson

Donna Ferguson

As Charles becomes King and Prince William steps in to his father’s shoes, many will be interested to see how he approaches the role. It’s not just taking on some of King Charles’ causes, as he outlined in a speech on Friday evening, it could also be that he is more likely to be more hands on and media friendly.

William will be a less formal, more tactile and more media-savvy Prince of Wales than his father – and he will continue to be a “hands-on father”. These are the predictions of a number of royal correspondents who have spent years observing the new Duke of Cornwall.

He will be able to connect better with younger generations and will carry out his duties as heir-apparent in a more relaxed way than Charles, while simultaneously taking a financially responsible and more circumspect approach to his role, they say.

“There have been quite a lot of question marks over the way Charles’s charities operate and where the money comes from,” said Nicholas Owen, a former ITN royal correspondent. “I think William is less likely to go along easily with people saying, ‘oh, everything’s all right, sir, no, leave it with me, that will be fine’.”

King Charles signals to aide to remove pens during signing of oath – video

Prime minister Liz Truss has spoken to both Indian prime minister Narendra Modi and New Zealand PM Jacinda Ardern today, after both sent their condolences after the Queen’s death.

Modi said his heartfelt condolences were “on the behalf of 1.3 billion Indians”, and Ardern spoke of her fondness for Her Majesty.

Charles and Camilla meet the archbishop of Canterbury

King Charles III and Camilla, the Queen Consort during an audience with the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby in the 1844 Room, at Buckingham Palace.
King Charles III and Camilla, the Queen Consort during an audience with the archbishop of Canterbury, Justin Welby in the 1844 Room, at Buckingham Palace. Photograph: Jonathan Brady/AP

King Charles III has started an afternoon of meetings, including with the archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, with whom he could be seen sharing a joke.

The new King takes up a position as head of the Church of England, with Welby his most senior archbishop. Some churches have been ringing their bells after the council of accession on Saturday lunchtime, and many have opened books of condolence. Weekly services on Sunday will hear prayers for King Charles’s reign, as well as those reflecting on the life of the Queen.

During his council of accession he also promised to uphold the security of the Church of Scotland.

Other meetings on Saturday include with the UK prime minister, Liz Truss, and leader of the Labour party, Sir Keir Starmer.

Clive James was one of the best known journalists in Britain until his death in 2019, highly regarded for his wit and intellect, and he spent many years writing for the Observer.

In 1983 he covered the Queen’s visit to the US, where she met Ronald Reagan. Here’s his article from the time.

The Royal Scuba Tour of California began last Saturday with scarcely any rain at all. The clouds over San Diego were full of water, but none of it was actually falling out of the sky as the Britannia edged towards Broadway Pier on the Embarcadero, just along from Anthony’s Fish Grotto.

The area was heavily populated with members of the secret service wearing hearing aids and talking into their sleeves. Less numerous but more cheerful were the citizens of San Diego, some of whom were allowed on to the pier itself, at the end of which is an honour guard of sailors and marines who drilled with M14s, while E-9 Master Chief Dye conducted the orchestra and frogmen checked for bombs.

As things were to turn out, the frogmen were the only people appropriately dressed for the upcoming week of official events, but as yet nobody knew that. The American media were in position and fully equipped, with Canon telephoto lenses the size of garbage disposal; units and microwave dishes aimed at their very own relay helicopters, which were up there in the grey sky like benign vultures.

You can read more by clicking here.

In pictures: Queen’s family outside Balmoral

Sophie, Countess of Wessex; Prince Andrew; Edward, Earl of Wessex; Princess Anne and Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence look at the flowers outside Balmoral Castle.
Sophie, Countess of Wessex; Prince Andrew; Edward, Earl of Wessex; Princess Anne and Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence look at the flowers outside Balmoral Castle. Photograph: Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images
Princess Eugenie and Princess Beatrice are consoled by their father Prince Andrew.
Princess Eugenie and Princess Beatrice are consoled by their father Prince Andrew. Photograph: Scott Heppell/AP
Princess Beatrice (left) and Sophie, Countess of Wessex look at the flowers placed outside Balmoral Castle.
Princess Beatrice (left) and Sophie, Countess of Wessex look at the flowers placed outside Balmoral Castle. Photograph: Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images
(Left to right) Princess Eugenie, the Earl of Wessex, Peter Phillips, Princess Anne, Zara Tindall, Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers.
(Left to right) Princess Eugenie, the Earl of Wessex, Peter Phillips, Princess Anne, Zara Tindall, Vice Admiral Timothy Laurence, Lady Louise Windsor and the Countess of Wessex view flowers. Photograph: Owen Humphreys/PA
Princess Beatrice outside Balmoral Castle.
Princess Beatrice outside Balmoral Castle. Photograph: Hannah McKay/Reuters
Princess Eugenie of York looks at the flowers outside Balmoral.
Princess Eugenie of York looks at the flowers outside Balmoral. Photograph: Andy Buchanan/AFP/Getty Images

Royal family meets wellwishers outside Balmoral

Members of the Royal family have left Crathie Kirk near Balmoral after a service to meet members of the public.

Prince Andrew, the Duke of York, was seen speaking to crowds, as did Princess Anne, the Princess Royal who was walking alongside her husband, Commander Timothy Laurence.

Anne’s children, Peter Phillips and Zara Tindall, were seen looking at floral tributes.

Prince Andrew put his glasses on before bending down to read some of the messages that had been left. He then moved across and put his arm around his daughter, Princess Eugenie, who could be seen drying her eyes and hugging her father while looking at the flowers.

“We’ve been allowed one day, now we start the process of handing her on,” Prince Andrew told the public, according to PA Media.

After moments reading the cards and memorials that had been left, the dozen-or-so members of the family paused in the gateway of Balmoral and turned to wave and thank the crowds who had gathered behind barriers.

Princess Anne views tributes with Edward, Earl of Wessex; Timothy Laurence, Peter Phillips and Zara Tindall. Photograph: Hannah McKay/Reuters
Prince Andrew inspects floral tributes outside Balmoral.
Prince Andrew inspects floral tributes outside Balmoral. Photograph: Phil Noble/Reuters

Peter Walker

Peter Walker

The Labour and Conservative party conferences later this and next month are expected to go ahead, it is understood, although the annual gathering of the Liberal Democrats could be in peril, one day of it coincides with the expected date of the Queen’s funeral.

The Lib Dems are scheduled to gather for their first fully in-person conference since before Covid from next weekend, going on till Tuesday 20 September. But with the official mourning period lasting until the likely funeral date, on Monday 19 September, the bulk of it will have to be postponed or moved.

A party source said: “We will not hold any part of our conference before or during the funeral.”

However, both the Labour and Conservative conferences are expected to take place, although both events will be amended to reflect the death of the Queen.

The Labour conference takes place in Liverpool from Sunday 25 September to Wednesday 28 September. The Conservative event, in Birmingham, starts on Sunday 2 October, also running to the next Wednesday.

The SNP conference a week after the Tories’, while the Greens meet from 30 September, so neither should be affected.

The Commons is scheduled to be in recess from 22 September to 17 October. But with the chamber due to be adjourned following tributes this weekend until after the funeral, this could potentially be changed to allow MPs to debate urgent issues including the energy cost crisis.

Royal Mail has said it will stop its services on the day of the Queen’s funeral.

The date is yet to be confirmed, but earlier on Saturday the new King approved an order to make it a bank holiday.

In a statement, Royal Mail’s chief executive, Simon Thompson, said: “We are proud that over the coming days Royal Mail will play an important role delivering messages of condolence from all around the world to the royal family.

“We want to make our customers aware that services will be suspended on the day of the funeral as people come together to honour Her Majesty, after 70 years of exemplary service to the nation and the Commonwealth.”

The relationship between the monarch and postal service has been in place for more than 500 years, since King Henry VIII appointed the first postmaster.

The former president of France François Hollande has paid tribute to the Queen and revealed that she once asked for the Republican Guards to play the Beatles at a state occasion.

Hollande hosted Queen Elizabeth in June 2014 for a three-day state visit that marked the 70th anniversary commemorations of the allied D-Day landings in the second world war.

“She talked about being a friend of France and her taste for French culture and generally for the arts,” Hollande, who was president until 2017, said.

“At one point, the Republican Guard was playing some classical music and I asked her what she would like and she said: can they play the Beatles? So the orchestra played several songs by the Beatles,” Hollande told Reuters, referring to the military unit which provides guards of honour at official ceremonies.

Queen’s family attends church service near Balmoral

Members of the Royal family have left Balmoral to attend a prayer service at nearby Crathie Kirk.

The Queen was a regular at the small church during her stays in Balmoral. Three of the Queen’s four children, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward have been at Balmoral since Thursday.

In the tumult of reaction to news of the Queen’s death, social media managers struggled to work out the best way to communicate to their customers. Reporter James Tapper has taken a look at the brands that got it right – and those who didn’t.

Members of the royal family still at Balmoral Castle are expected to attend a church service this afternoon at nearby Crathie Kirk.

The BBC reports that among those still at Balmoral, where the Queen’s body remains, are Princess Anne and her husband, Tim Lawrence, Prince Andrew; the Earl and Countess of Wessex, and some of the Queen’s grandchildren: Peter Phillips, Zara Tindall, princesses Beatrice and Eugenie and Lady Louise Windsor.

During the accession council ceremony at St James’s Palace on Saturday morning, Prince William was seen signing the proclamation documents using his left hand, causing quite a stir on social media. Within the royal family, there are quite a few left-handers. Queen Victoria and the Queen’s father, former king George VI were left-handed, as is Prince Edward’s wife Sophie, Countess of Wessex, and, allegedly, Prince George.

Lisa O'Carroll

Lisa O’Carroll

Lisa O’Carroll is at Buckingham Palace today. She gives us a sense of the atmosphere there as crowds gather:

People have queued quietly in their thousands all day on the approach roads to Buckingham palace – some bearing flowers, some wearing union jacks. Children, adults, tourists, all wanting to get close to a bit of royal history.

Along Horse Guards Parade, a hint of the funeral pageantry to come over the next eight days. Barricades were being stacked discreetly on the pavements, articulated trucks carrying seating make their way towards Piccadilly.

It feels as though the volume of visitors is overwhelming the stewards, comprised of police and volunteer forces. Pinch points have formed at ancient narrow passages around Clarence House through the back routes local people believed would help them beat the queues entering St James’s Park and Green Park. All to no avail.

A rather concerning sign of the momentous week to come, when crowds will have to be managed carefully.

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