Hurricane Fiona caused widespread devastation in Puerto Rico. Now it has its sights set on Bermuda

Hurricane Fiona pushed past Puerto Rico and made landfall in the Dominican Republic on Monday morning. It will continue to strengthen as it moves toward the Turks and Caicos Islands and Bermuda. Hurricane Fiona made landfall as a Category 1 hurricane very early on Monday morning. As of 10 a.m., Fiona’s center was 135 miles southeast of Grand Turk Island. Sustainable winds are still near 90 mph and will continue to strengthen as it moves to the northwest at 9 mph. Hurricane-force winds extend outward for 30 miles from the center of Fiona. Tropical-hurricane-force winds extend for about 140 miles. Fiona invades Puerto Rico, completely out of power and causing devastating floods. It moved over the eastern side of the Dominican Republic on Monday morning, and moved north-west into warm waters. It will pass just east of the Eastern Turks and Caicos Islands tomorrow. It is likely to be a Category 2 hurricane with sustained winds of 105 mph by that time. It will continue to move north and may be a major hurricane, Category 3, by Tuesday night/Wednesday morning as it passes east of the Bahamas with winds of 115 mph. Forecast winds in the Atlantic are up to 125 mph. It will still be so strong when it gets closer to Bermuda. By next weekend, it could affect parts of Eastern/Atlantic Canada. With the exception of bringing high surf to the East Coast, Fiona does not appear to be a threat to the continental United States. Now there are two areas that we are seeing in the tropics, and both have low potential for development over the next five days. An area of ​​low pressure over the mid-subtropical Atlantic is associated with uncoordinated rainfall and thunderstorms. The system may evolve over the next few days, but the probability of formation is only 30%. While over open water the system will generally move north. Another tropical wave to the west of the Windward Islands has been identified by the NHC for possible development later in the week. Chances are low at 20%, but this wave needs to be closely watched as some forecast data show growth potential once it enters the Caribbean and takes a possible track WNW that will target the Yucatan Channel. So far this year, we have six named storms, three of which have become hurricanes. Normally by now, we would have nine named storms, four hurricanes, and one to two major hurricanes. Dry air, Saharan dust and wind shear have played a major role in preventing tropical development and intensification this season. Stay tuned with WDSU Weather for the latest updates.

Hurricane Fiona pushed past Puerto Rico and made landfall in the Dominican Republic on Monday morning. It will continue to strengthen as it moves toward the Turks and Caicos Islands and Bermuda.

Hurricane Fiona made landfall as a Category 1 hurricane very early on Monday morning. As of 10 a.m., Fiona’s center was 135 miles southeast of Grand Turk Island. Sustainable winds are still near 90 mph and will continue to move to the northwest at 9 mph.

Hurricane-force winds extend outward for 30 miles from the center of Fiona. Tropical-hurricane-force winds extend for about 140 miles.

Fiona invades Puerto Rico, completely out of power and causing devastating floods. It moved over the eastern side of the Dominican Republic on Monday morning, and moved north-west into warm waters. It will pass just east of the Eastern Turks and Caicos Islands tomorrow. It is likely to be a Category 2 hurricane with sustained winds of 105 mph by that time.

It will continue to move north and may be a major hurricane, Category 3, by Tuesday night/Wednesday morning as it passes east of the Bahamas with winds of 115 mph. Forecast winds in the Atlantic are up to 125 mph. It will still be so strong when it gets closer to Bermuda.

By next weekend, it could affect parts of Eastern/Atlantic Canada. With the exception of bringing high surf to the East Coast, Fiona does not appear to be a threat to the continental United States.

tropics

We are now seeing two areas in the tropics, and both have little potential for growth over the next five days. An area of ​​low pressure is associated over the central subtropical Atlantic with uncoordinated rainfall and thunderstorms. The system may evolve over the next few days, but the probability of formation is only 30%. While over open water the system will generally move north.

Another tropical wave west of the Windward Islands has been identified by the NHC for possible development later in the week. Chances are low at 20%, but this wave needs to be closely watched as some forecast data show growth potential once it enters the Caribbean and takes a possible track WNW that will target the Yucatan Channel.

tropics

So far this year we have had six named storms, three of which have become hurricanes. Normally by now, we would have nine named storms, four hurricanes, and one to two major hurricanes. Dry air, Saharan dust and wind shear have played a major role in preventing tropical development and intensification this season.

Stay tuned with WDSU Weather for the latest updates.

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